Visaurihelix

 

Reimagining the Glasgow of Charles Rennie Mackintosh is the audio-visual installation Visaurihelix, showcasing in The Lighthouse, Glasgow, until 2 January 2019.

Visaurihelix Artist, Dr Louise Harris explained the exhibition title, saying: “It is a made up word, used to summarise the installation, its first part represents visuals, auri is related to sound and helix is related to the helical staircase of The Lighthouse.

The Lighthouse had commissioned the piece, by sending out a brief for a work that would both fit its unique space and celebrate the 150-year legacy of Charles Rennie Mackintosh.

Harris said:“I have been obsessed with Mackintosh design and architecture since I was a child, and I am also obsessed with spiral staircases, so it was a pretty perfect combination for me; so I applied to the brief, and there you go!”

Harris used her expertise in audio-visual art to compile soundscapes from Charles Rennie Mackintosh buildings, before combining and presenting them in a new way. This included using speakers, on The Lighthouse staircase, to vertically play sound recorded from five Rennie Mackintosh sites.

Harris explained: “The majority of the pitched material in the work is mapped from those sites; I built algorithmic software patches that took the site designs and translated them to changes in pitch over time, and that made the electronic backbone of the work.”

She added: “The other audio material is sound that has been recorded in those five spaces and has been combined into the work.”

The work was then made interactive by entwining The Lighthouse staircase in a giant glockenspiel construction, the angles of which mimicked patterns of Charles Rennie Mackintosh design, allowing visitors to create their own sounds.

Harris said:“When I was working in the studio I had to make guesses as to how noises would sound when travelling vertically, not horizontally, so that was quite challenging, but it was a good challenge, it made me think more about how to work with multi-speaker formats in more detail.”

She added:“I was quite surprised how well the speakers worked together, but also how the glockenspiel element turned out.”

 

While Harris knew the exhibition space would be a challenging part of the project, an unexpected challenge arose when the Glasgow School of Art suffered a fire.

Harris said:“I was planning to record sounds from the Art School and include them as one of the building soundscapes in the installation; but the fire happened literally a couple of days before I was due to go in and collect the material, so it was quite poignant.”

Despite being unable to capture soundscapes from the Art School, Harris hopes that Visaurihelix will allow people to reflect on all of Rennie Mackintosh’s work.

She said: “I hope this exhibition’s visitors have enjoyed engaging with different Mackintosh spaces, from different places in the city, and so it acts as a tribute to the Art School as well.”

When first arrived in Glasgow, Harris couldn’t wait to see Mackintosh’s buildings up close.

She explained: “I am a relative new comer to Glasgow, I have only lived here for around four or five years, but the Lighthouse and the Mackintosh buildings and galleries were some of the first things that I explored when I got here.”

Harris moved to Glasgow to take up a position at Glasgow University.

She said: “When I got my job in Glasgow, my title was Lecturer in Sound and Audio Visual Practices, and that type of role was unheard of at the time, but these days it is much more common.

“The audio-visual art scene has changed hugely in the last 10 years or so, audio-visual work has become more prominent in festivals and galleries.”

Harris added:‘I think Glasgow’s audio-visual art scene will continue to develop in coming years. Festivals like Sonica are really good foregrounds for audio-visual art work, so I think Glasgow is quite ahead of the game in that sense.”

Despite this, Harris accepts that the definition of audio-visual art can still be confusing.

She said: “My audio-visual art is about creating pieces that engage your sonic and visual senses simultaneously, and give equal weight to both. If you think about a music video its is about marketing the sound, and if you think about a narrative film that is primarily about the visual; but audio-visual work is about the equality of the relationship between the two mediums.”

To explore Harris’ audio-visual art in other venues, you can see her exhibition, Alocas, in the Stephen Lawrence Gallery, in Greenwich London, from November 2018 until January 2019.

Harris summarised: “Alocas involves a dual screen speaker and audio-visual work. The audience is situated in the middle of two large screens, so it is a very immersive, physical and participatory experience.”

The Only Way is Ethics

TOWIEtwit pic

 

Social conscience stirs as Glasgow plans its alternative lifestyle festival. The Only Way Ethics will busy the city, from November 29 to December 6, with ethical discussions focused on improving Glasgow.

Organiser Craig Tannock said: “Some of the issues the festival will cover include the energy crisis, anti austerity, women’s activism, ethical arts funding and organic food.”

 He explained: “The festival will cover issues in a range of ways, such as panel discussions, theatre events, film screenings and community meals.”

Food will also reign supreme at Vegfest Scotland, the Vegan exhibition that is partnering the festival. This exhibition will run in the SECC, during the last two days of The only Way is Ethics. Vegfest Scotland will offer information, demonstration and delectation.

Tannock explained: “Vegfest is a huge event, but for the rest of the festival we encouraged smaller venues to get involved. We wanted to make the festival accessible to everyone; so it has a variety of spaces for people to engage with experts and others on ethical issues.”

These spaces will be found in venues throughout the city, including The University of Glasgow, Chemikal Underground Records, Glasgow Women’s Library, and Toonspeak Young People’s Theatre.

While most venues are open to all ages, Tannock explained that some licensed events won’t admit children, and other events have adult themes.

He said: “Some events are for a more adult audience, such as the talk and screening of a film about vCJD in the food chain. This kind of event doesn’t make for easy consumption and people would probably decide not to bring children; however we will leave it to them to decide.”

As well as heavy discussion the festival will have light entertainment. Nowhere is this truer than in its opening gig at St Luke’s. The venue (near the Barrowlands) will host Radio 2 Folk Award winner, Karine Polwart and artist Ela Orleans, among others.

Then, after eight days of events, the festival will close in equal style.

Tannock said: “The closing night will be a real chilled out party at the Flying Duck; with some unannounced surprises. By this point there will have been plenty of chin- scratching, so it will be a purely social event, allowing people to catch up with others they have met.”

Encouraging everyone to come along, Tannock concluded: “The Festival of Ethics provides a space for free thought on social issues; it allows people to get involved in movements that can change lives.”